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Tupac murder: Las Vegas PD reveals evidence seized from 'Compton Kingpin'

Las Vegas police revealed evidence seized from Duane Keith Davis' Nevada home is related to rapper Tupac Shakur's unsolved 1996 murder.

Las Vegas police seized over a dozen items from a home connected to the self-proclaimed "Compton Kingpin," who has said for years he was in the car when rapper Tupac Shakur was gunned down.

Duane "Keffe D" Davis, 60, was the target of a search warrant that police executed earlier this week in the city of Henderson, about 20 miles southeast of the Las Vegas strip.

They confiscated a Pokeball USB Drive, an iPhone, three iPads (one with a cracked screen), four laptops, a tablet, a desktop computer, several external hard drives, copies of the book "Compton Street Legends," a Vibe magazine about Shakur and two "black tubs" of photos, according to the search warrant.

Davis' nephew, Orlando Anderson, was considered the prime suspect in the rap superstar's death in 1996. Anderson denied involvement before he was killed in a separate shooting in Compton, California, in 1998.

LAS VEGAS POLICE SEARCH HOME AS PART OF PROBE INTO TUPAC SHAKUR'S 1996 MURDER

Neighbors watched law enforcement raid the home Wednesday night. 

"There were cruisers and SWAT vehicles. They had lights shining on the house," Don Sansouci told The Associated Press. Sansouci had just gone to bed with his wife when a swirl of blue and red police lights stirred them awake after 9 p.m.

Public records link the property to Davis and his wife, although it's unclear if he still lives in the same home. One neighbor told the Las Vegas Review-Journal Davis doesn't live at that address.

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Las Vegas court records show there has been an active warrant out for Davis' arrest since July 2022, when he failed to appear in court on a drug charge.

Las Vegas police haven't released any other details, except what was in the search warrant, which was first obtained by NBC News.

The warrant covered all types of computers, electronic storage devices, any documentation (including photos, movies, CDs, writings) that connects Davis to the South Side Compton Crips street gang, cellphones and his memoir, "Compton Street Legend."

Police also searched for "notes, writings, ledgers and other handwritten or typed documents" about anything mentioning the murder of Shakur, according to the warrant. 

Davis, the self-proclaimed "Compton Kingpin," initially denied any involvement in the legendary rap star's death but seemingly opened up and recently discussed his involvement in interviews in news articles and documentaries. 

He said he came forward because of a cancer diagnosis in the 2018 documentary called "Unsolved: The Murders of Tupac and the Notorious B.I.G."

Everyone in the car, including Davis, was affiliated with the South Side Compton Crips street gang, and they were looking for Shakur after he brawled with one of the gang members a few hours before his death, Davis said.

They searched for Shakur in the 662 Club in Las Vegas, but he wasn't there, according to Davis. Then they saw him driving toward the club.

"My partner bust a U," Davis said in the documentary. "When we pulled up, I was in the front seat."

The gunshots rang out from the back seat. Davis never said who actually pulled the trigger. 

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"Going to keep it for the code of the streets. It just came from the back seat," he said in the documentary. 

The night of Sept. 7, 1996, Shakur rode shotgun in Death Row Records co-founder Marion "Suge" Knight's black BMW when a white Cadillac pulled up alongside them while they were stopped at a light.

Shakur's murder shook the hip-hop world and remains one of the country's most infamous cold cases. 

He was just 25 at the time. His fourth solo record, "All Eyez on Me," was still at the top of the charts with about 5 million copies sold. 

Lack of cooperation from witnesses stalled the investigation, and the case has gone unsolved for almost 30 years. 

The best lead came in 2018 when Davis broke his silence during an interview for a BET show, where he reportedly implicated his nephew. 

Shakur's murder was even more eerie after his lyrics seemed to foreshadow his early death.

"The fast life ain’t everything they told ya. Never get much older, following the tracks of a soulja," he wrote in his 1991 song "Soulja's Story."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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