Sign In  |  Register  |  About Menlo Park  |  Contact Us

Menlo Park, CA
September 01, 2020 1:28pm
7-Day Forecast | Traffic
  • Search Hotels in Menlo Park

  • CHECK-IN:
  • CHECK-OUT:
  • ROOMS:

Florida woman leaves $300K estate to her seven Persian cats as adoption requests pour in

A woman from Tampa, Florida, has left her pricey estate to her seven pet cats after dying, according to multiple sources. Now, 156 applicants have inquired about adopting the felines.

A Florida woman reportedly has left a pricey estate to her seven beloved Persian cats, who were her loyal companions until the day she died — and there now appears to be no shortage of people wanting to adopt the felines, as they come with an inheritance of sorts.

"I've gotten, believe it or not, 156 applications for these remaining six cats, which is crazy to me," Sherry Silk, executive director of the Humane Society of Tampa Bay, told Fox News Digital.

"She did leave a six-figure estate for their care, which is feeding, grooming, medical supplies, toys, treats — whatever people want to do," she said of the woman who passed away. "We are going to reimburse people up to that."

Silk went on, "The total amount for the seven cats is just over $300,000, which is a lot of money."

SHELTER CAT WHO WENT VIRAL THANKS TO 'SAD AND DEPRESSED' PHOTO IS NOW HELPING OTHER CATS GET ADOPTED

Nancy Sauer of Tampa, Florida, died in November at the age of 84. 

Her only child, a son, died before her — and her will reportedly stated that her seven Persian cats were to remain in the house until the last one died.

The cats are named Midnight, Snowball, Goldfinger, Leo, Squeaky, Cleopatra and Napoleon, Fox 13 Tampa Bay reported. 

The felines lived in Sauer’s million-dollar home in South Tampa.

"She was a lot of fun and we miss her in the neighborhood," neighbor Leslie Farrell, who lived next door to Sauer for 10 years, told the station. "I really enjoyed just chatting with her."

Farrell added of Sauer and her cats, "What she really wanted was for them to be cared for."

Seven months after Sauer's death, it was determined by a probate judge that the caretakers charged with providing for the cats were not able to fulfill their duties — leaving the pets in an unhealthy environment. 

That’s when Silk and the Human Society of Tampa Bay stepped in to help, Silk said.

CATS QUIZ! HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT FELINES? TEST YOURSELF!

"They were not cared for like they should have been," Silk said. "I'm sure Nancy would never, ever have allowed that or wanted that for her cats. So they weren't in the best shape."

She went on, "But they're good now. We have a shelter vet here — they've been on antibiotics and they got their baths. They've been groomed. They're in great shape now."

Silk said that Snowball has a heart condition and was adopted by her vet.

HUSKY DOG WHO WAS CALLED 'UGLY' FOR CROOKED SMILE FINDS FAMILY WHO DRIVES 2.6K MILES TO ADOPT HIM

But these aren’t typical pet adoptions, Silk explained.

"It still falls under the jurisdiction of the courts," Silk said. "Reports have to be generated every couple months about how much money's been spent, who's adopted them and all that. So I've kind of weeded through those 156 applications and my goal is to have them out by this weekend or by early next week."

Sauer’s cats were accustomed to a certain lifestyle, Silk said. 

So Humane Society staff has kept the cats together in one community cat room — where they have access to an outside lanai that is covered.

"But they need to be in a home," she said. "That's the most important thing. I believe Nancy just wanted them to be loved and cherished."

Silk said she did not know Sauer personally, but has learned a lot about her from the executor of her estate.

"He's known her for over 20 years, so he's told me some great stories about her," Silk said. "She was a lovely woman and also a bit eccentric, so take that for what it is. And she did have some wealth." 

That was evidenced by her estate sale this month that apparently included lavish amounts of furniture, fixtures, art work and jewelry.

"She wouldn't just buy one thing that she just liked," Silk said. "She had things that every lady probably has — but I’ve got 10 or 15 tubes of lipstick in my cosmetic area. She had 50 shades of the same lipstick, not even open. She just bought and bought and bought. So she was kind of a collector of things that she liked."

The executor of Sauer’s estate — who did not wish to be named, Silk said — told her that shopping was the woman’s second love. 

"Her cats were her first love," Silk said. "And her big fear was that they were going to be lonely without her. So we're going to make sure that they go to a good home. There may be two of them that are going to go together, but frankly, I was surprised the cats really don't like each other."

ANIMAL SHELTER STAFF RESORTS TO DRAWING PICTURES OF PETS AFTER CAMERA 'BREAKS': 'THIRD DIMENSION IS OVERRATED'

Silk said that after having them around the shelter for six weeks now, she is looking for just the right people to adopt the Persians, as they are not very friendly.

"They're not the most affectionate cats in the cat world," Silk said. "That's what we're seeing here. They want to be by you and they don't mind being brushed. They actually like being brushed. But they're not cuddlers."

She added, "So people who have said, ‘I want a cat to sit on the couch with me and cuddle with me' — this is not [that] kind of cat."

Silk said staff is trying to do its due diligence, matching the right type of family with the cats.

CALIFORNIA CAT SHELTER GOES VIRAL FOR SHARING ITS HILARIOUS 'NICE OR NAUGHTY' FELINE OF THE WEEK

"I think they would really like a quiet home because that's what they're used to," Silk said. "People who have submitted applications who have a whole house full of kids — we’re not going to be interested in that just because they're used to a nice, quiet environment."

She went on, "So that's what we're looking for, and I'm confident that we'll find the right home."

Adopters will be required to sign a legal agreement that if, for whatever reason, their life changes and they can't keep the cat, they will bring it back to be placed in another home. 

"I think it's a great reminder to all of us who love our animals to have some kind of a plan," Silk said.

She also said, "You don't have to be a millionaire" to have a plan for your pets.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

"So if something happens to you, the animals don't get picked up by animal control and end up in a shelter somewhere. I think that's what Nancy kind of put out there, that she had a plan," Silk said. 

Silk added she hopes the story reminds people that shelters are full of homeless animals in need of love and affection.

"If you don't get one of the Persians over all these other people that have wanted them, come look at all the other great cats and dogs," Silk said. 

And "if you're a cat person, come look at all the great cats that we have. Shelters and rescues are full of cats across the country, and we hope this reminds people."

Data & News supplied by www.cloudquote.io
Stock quotes supplied by Barchart
Quotes delayed at least 20 minutes.
By accessing this page, you agree to the following
Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions.
 
 
Copyright © 2010-2020 MenloPark.com & California Media Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.